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Talking Turkey

   
 

...the Wine-ding Road!

   

 

  

 

We are not talking turkey.  Change has come to America and anything is game for the table in terms of food for the adventurous - Asian dishes juxtaposed with modern variations on classic American Thanksgiving fare perhaps?  A cornucopia of foods, sweet and savory, the wild, luxuriant mingling of flavor and texture.  Stuffing and cranberry sauce, the side dishes that could span the globe in terms of culinary origin.  The only certainty is an abundance in the miscellany at the table.

The question really becomes what to drink with all this.  What one should be looking for are wines with wonderful acidity and some structure that are able to stand up to all the different flavors at the table.  What doesn't quite work are wines that are all about big, sweet fruit flavors and too much oak with no crispness or vitality.  Unfortunately, that rules out most California reds.  In general, whites are a better choice as they tend to have more acidity than reds, and can hold their own with all the flavors on the plate. 

A few wines at various price points that we think might work at the Thanksgiving table:

2007 Geyser Peak Sauvignon Blanc ($10.99) 
This Californian Sauvignon has notes of pungent gooseberry and lively citrus fruits, and is backed up by bright acidity.

2007 Félines Jourdan Picpoul de Pinet ($12.99) 
This white wine from the South of France is all about white flowers, lemon, and has amazing minerality and acidity.  Picpoul in the regional dialect means "lip-smacking".  This wine is floral and fruity with a refreshing acidity that offers a delicious counterpoint to all the richness at the table.

2006 Jean-Paul Brun Morgon les Terres Dorées ($16.99) 
If you are going red, we suggest going with a wine from one of the villages in the Beaujolais region of France.  That does mean foregoing the Beaujolais Nouveau, however.  This wine from the town of Morgon has layers of cherries and dark fruits, all balanced by racy acidity that keeps your palate nicely refreshed.

NV Champagne Moutard Brut Grande Cuvée ($32.99) 
Champagne is one of the most versatile wines out there.  It has the fruitiness, acidity and structure to hold up to almost all foods (even the spiciest dishes!).  This champagne offers tons of dry lemony and yeasty notes, ending with a zingy acidity and a mouthful of structure that nicely complements almost anything that might be at the Thanksgiving table.

Bottoms up!

 

 

Michel Robert Abood contributed to this piece.  He can be found at:
Random Ramblings on Wine and Food 
Vinotas Imports

 

Tags:  food      

 

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