1

0

 

0

8

 

0

8

 

A

R

T

 

1

0

 

0

8

 

0

8

 

A

R

T

 

1

0

 

0

8

 

 

 

 

   

 

   
       
 

Louise Bourgeois

   
 

Endless spiral . . .

   

 

  

 

An inspiration to all of us--the fact that for over seven decades, the sculptor Louise Bourgeois has created a difficult oeuvre that explores the relationship between sculpture, architecture, and the human body and that she manages to be modern, relevant, and vital.  The Parisian--born artist moved to New York in 1938 with her husband, the art critic Richard Goldwater, and has been a New Yorker ever since.

We took in the recent Guggenheim retrospective last week.  We were greeted in the rotunda by her iconic spiders.  The spider for Bourgeois has associations with memory and her mother; the family business was after all that most mythological of enterprises--the repair of tapestries.  Spiroid metal sculptures were suspended from the ceiling; the spiral is a recurring motif in her work and these pieces melded marvelously with the museumís own winding ramp.  Her Personages, tall thin sculptures that she huddled together evoked both New York skyscrapers and groupings of people: a family, a circle of friends, a wider community.  She uses a wide range of materials in her work: metal, stone, wood, latex, resin, marble, pieces of fabric. 

Also on show were her Cells--sculptural installations that incorporated both her work and the architecture within which they were displayed.  In some, the viewer walked inside, while in others one looked through windows in order to view the contents--a jumble of sculptures, found items and personal objects.  

Bourgeois, a force of nature, continues to create at age 97.

 

 

 

 

 

 

       
 

Read: Louise Bourgeois

Buy: Cheim Read Gallery

Watch: Videos on Bourgeois

 

Tags:  art  museums  sculpture   

new york buildings

Share:    

 

 
       
     

Subscribe About Us Editorial Policy Privacy Policy Contact Us Unsubscribe  

Press Archives Search  

 

 

 

©2008 eCognoscente