Subscribe

   
 
 

 

 

 

1

0

 

2

9

 

0

8

 

T

H

E

A

T

R

E

 

1

0

 

2

9

 

0

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   
       
 

EQUUS

   
 

  all sound and fury...

   

 

  

 

Peter Shaffer's 1973 Equus is back with a fury, offering up insights into the mind of both psychiatrist and patient.  The play takes Christianity, Greek mythology, the centaur, self-flagellation, sexuality, and guilt and with broad strokes creates from these elements what is in essence a psychiatric thriller.

The play's main character, stable hand Alan Strang (Daniel Radcliffe), lives with an overly religious mother and a controlling father. Obsessed with horses, he commits an act of unspeakable violence.  Enter Martin Dysart (Richard Griffiths), a middle-aged child psychiatrist.  In the course of his sessions with Alan, Dysart questions everything from his own professional and personal life to basic assumptions about normative sexual development. 

Director Thea Sharrock reprises the original production's innovative staging, including actors in wire horse heads and hooves and audience members seated in the round above the stage.  Griffiths and Radcliffe give powerful performances, as does Kate Mulgrew as Hesther Saloman, the magistrate who first brings Alan to Dysart's attention.

Based on an unverified anecdote recounted to Schaffer by a friend, Equus won several Tonys in 1975, including Best Play and Best Director for John Dexter.  The 1977 Sidney Lumet film starred Richard Burton, Peter Firth, and Joan Plowright.  The production received a standing ovation the night we saw it - canter don't trot to the Broadhurst Theater, if you can find a ticket….

 

See: Equus, Broadhurst Theatre

See: Equus, the film

 

Tags:  theatre  broadway    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

       
 

 
       
     

Subscribe About Us Editorial Policy Privacy Policy Contact Us Unsubscribe  

Press Archives Search  

 

 

 

©2008 eCognoscente