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gypset glamour


 
 

BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY

   

 

Gypset (from gypsy-meets-jet set), is the new variation on old elements of the fashion vocabulary: bohemian luxury, bobo fashion (bourgeois bohemian or gauche caviar), haute hippie style....all permutations of fashion ideas that have been around since the late 60s/early 70s (think the iconic image of Talitha and John Paul Getty, photographed by Paul Lichfield for Vogue in 1969, above).

 

Gypset has become fashion buzzword ever since Julia Chaplin’s book Gypset Style was issued last year by Assouline, and the idea has been gathering steam (see net-a-porter.com's recent Gypset issue online.)

 

The Gypset look: Kaftans, floor-skimming dresses, scarf dresses, vibrant patterns, glorious color, glittery sandals, armloads of bangles, chandelier earrings.  Smoky Cleopatra eyes.  Perfect for this hot hot weather.

 

Julia Chaplin has said, “I first encountered the gypset while working as a travel writer for the New York Times...the gypset are an emerging group of artists, musicians, fashion designers, surfers, and bon vivants who lead semi-nomadic lives, unconventional lives. They are people who have perfected a high-low approach that fuses the freelance and nomadic wile of a gypsy with the sophistication and global references of the jet set.” 

 


Hermes ad extolling the Gypset idea

 

She codifies the set here on her website, gypset.com, 10 ways to spot a gypsetter:
 

1) HANGS OUT IN PLACES THAT ARE HARD TO REACH: PREFERABLY MORE THAN THREE HOURS FROM A MAJOR AIRPORT; DOWN DIRT ROADS

2) MANSIONS OR VILLAS ARE OKAY IF THEY BELONG TO SOMEONE ELSE OR ARE SERIOUSLY RUN DOWN

3) NEVER WEARS CLOTHES WITH VISIBLE LOGOS

4) MONTAUK NOT EASTHAMPTON; IBIZA NOT CAPRI; VENICE BEACH NOT SANTA MONICA ETC.

5) DOESN’T MIND FALLING ASLEEP WITH SALTY HAIR

6) DRINKS AGUARDIENTE NOT CRISTAL

...and so on...

...and which we thought rather amusing.  The real gypsy, in the poetic sense of the word, is never part of a set.  And can never be really classified.

 

gypsy, c.1600, alteration of gypcian, form of egypcien 'Egyptian,' from the mistaken origin of the gypsies (who were actually nomadic tribes that left India in waves, beginning about a 1000 years ago, moving westward.)  In Spain, gitano.  In France they were bohemién and the word bohemian also has the sense of being a social gypsy, of being unconventional, free, vagabondish!  The term 'Bohemian' has come to be very commonly accepted in our day as the description of a certain kind of literary gipsey, no matter in what language he speaks, or what city he inhabits .... A Bohemian is simply an artist or littérateur who, consciously or unconsciously, secedes from conventionality in life and in art. ["Westminster Review," 1862]

 


Yves Saint Laurent in Marrakesh, 1976

 

So we say don’t take seriously Chaplin’s slightly odd attempt to classify the real gypsy heart, and that the word bohemian in a literary sense has less to do with the nomadic tribes that left India or with group behavior and everything to do with the poetic sense of the artist or littérateur who has the courage to be unconventional, independent.  And this gypsy idea can be extrapolated to the inventor, the website entrepreneur, the banker, the surgeon, to any profession really...it perhaps best represents a spirit--the courage to be daring, the courage to leave home, to not remain attached to tradition and convention when progress means moving on....) It’s an old idea really: think Victorian explorers, Byron, Paul Bowles...

 

And, of course, we say yes to the fabulous fashion....!

 

Read: Gypset Style, Julia Chaplin

 

Shop Gypset style: net-a-porter.com

 

Explore online: gypset.com

 

Tags: fashion  travel       

 

 


Chanel Resort 2011 channeling Gypset!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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