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Sade, Kathryn Bigelow, Fashion 2010

 
 

Soldiering On...

   

 

...Open the hurt locker
and see what there is of knives
and teeth. Open the hurt locker and learn
how rough men come hunting for souls.

from the poem The Hurt Locker, Brian Turner

 

Kathryn Bigelow winning big this week not only in the arena of film, but a woman staking out territory in the arena of war.  This a modern war where the enemy is unseen, the tension is all in the defusing, a movie of action, and equally, of ideas.  Mark Boal, the embedded journalist who wrote the screenplay, says that the title came from a phrase he had heard a few times while in Iraq; the word hurt common already in the language of war, the usage going back to Vietnam and the world of hurt.  In Iraq, in the argot of the bomb squads, the hurt locker is the place you go to if you make a mistake!

 

And then there is another woman singing of war.  Sade is back with a beautiful, meditative new album, Soldier of Love, which has been residing at the very top of the Billboard charts for weeks now.  She looks improbably young, her face unlined, singing in her own classic fashion, impervious to trends.  Unchanging really, perhaps in the sense of being true to herself.  Iíve lost the use of my heart, but Iím still alive, she sings in husky alto in the video On the album cover, Sade in silvery clothes that allude to armor and breastplate, Mayan ruins, roses in her hair.  This is the arena of war, but also of love.  Like Bigelow, Sade doesnít play the game: she doesnít give interviews, Bigelow does not indulge in the market testing that is so common in Hollywood.  These are women who donít pander.  They are tough...about their art.

 

Fashion has always been armor.  This year, all signs from the runways are for the military trend back in full force.  Ohne Titel playing with texture and different fabrics, Philosophy's wonderful belted coats, military blazers at Balmain, Comme des GarÁons' moss-green cropped jacket.  All the colors of the clothes of war: khaki, olive-brown, camouflage, sand. Yet the best looks were when all that posturing was softened;  at Burberry Prorsum the lovely palliating fluidity of washed chiffon tulle drapery in skirts and dresses.  And now with quick turnaround times, the global cheap-chic versions to follow at H&M, Topshop, and Zara; modern armor can be bought at all price points.

 

In Bigelowís 1995 film, Strange Days, a cult classic of sorts, Angela Bassett plays a tough yet vulnerable woman, and the flinty thriller ends softly, with the unabashedly romantic,  slow-motion kiss scene between Ralph Fiennes and Bassett.  The yielding heart beneath all that battle gear.  The language of love and the language of war have always been inextricably linked.  Hurt.  Conquest, and surrender.

  

 

Read: The Hurt Locker, Brian Turner

 

Listen: Soldier of Love, Sade

 

See: Strange Days

 

 

Tags:  film  music fashion  war

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Burberry Prorsum, Spring 2010

 

 

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