0

3

 

3

0

 

1

0

 

 

F

I

L

M

 

 

0

3

 

3

0

 

1

0

 

 

F

I

L

M

 

 

 

0

3

 

3

0

 

1

0

 

 

 

F

I

L

M

 

 

 

0

3

 

3

0

 

1

0

 

 

 

   


 

       

Out of the Blue

 
 

Krystof Kieślowski

   

 

Something old, something blue.  When one is weary of the constant stream of the new, food for the soul from that inexhaustible library of film classics that lend themselves to repeated viewings. 

 

A car crashes into a tree somewhere in the French countryside, taking the lives of Julie's (Juliette Binoche) husband, composer Patrice de Courcy, and daughter, Anna.  Legendary Polish director Krystof Kieślowski (1941-1996) begins his 1993 masterpiece Blue with tragedy, but it is a beginning that transforms itself into a delicate and sophisticated meditation on the theme of liberty in all the senses that matter on an individual level: physical, emotional, intellectual.  The first film in the Trois Couleurs Trilogy (for the French revolutionary ideals—Blue for liberty, White for equality, and Red for fraternity), Blue is scored throughout with the color blue, a color which is redolent with dolor but can also sparkle with the happiness of clear skies and calm water.  Blue filters, blue lighting, the cerulean foil of a lollipop wrapper, sapphire of swimming pool, lovely ultramarine glass of chandelier.  Binoche’s blue funk as she moves through the film with a vulnerable resilience, her face which has something of the gamine all controlled emotion as she lives through all the shades of grief and mourning.

 

Julie gives up the large country house with all its trappings, moves to Paris where she attempts to find solace in anonymity.  That is until her husband’s old artistic collaborator, Olivier (Benôit Régent), who has always been in love with her, tracks her down.  Olivier has been working on her husband’s unfinished composition Concerto for The Unification of Europe, but a mystery persists as to the work’s authorship.  Liberty here is learning to love again, make music again.  The music in Blue, composed by Zbigniew Preisner, possesses a mystical azure particularly in the last (montage) sequence in the film, a musical adaptation of St Paul’s Epistle to the Corinthians (lovely lines with images of tinkling cymbals and sounding brass that lead to the notion of a music that is true, the spiritual inner voice, not the hollow resonance of the thoughtless repetition of tired ideas....)

 

Kieślowski’s very genius is his spiritual quality—the soul music in his mythological stories, his appreciation for character and faces, a certain studied nuance that has nothing of the vague about it.  Blue is an ode to the life lived as a symphony.  Kieslowski who linked his films with repeated images, and often used the same actors over and over again, adds another dimension to the idea of grief, memory, and love by casting Emmanuelle Riva from Hiroshima Mon Amour to play Binoche’s aging mother.

 

See: Blue

 

See: Trois Couleurs Trilogy

 

See: Hiroshima Mon Amour

 

From the eCognoscente archives, another film in shades of blue: Before the Rains

 

Tags:    film  literature  france  duras  kieslowski

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this article on facebook:   

Share:                    

 

Forward this email to a friend Permalink  

 

 

 

     

Subscribe About Us Editorial Policy Privacy Policy Contact Us Unsubscribe  

Press Archives Search  

 

 

©2010 eCognoscente
Six Hundred West 146 Street, New York, NY 10031