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Hamming It Up!

 
 

 Salumeria Rosi

   

 

  

From Parma, the city which developed two of the world's culinary wonders -- parmigiano reggiano and prosciutto di Parma -- comes Salumeria Rosi Parmacotto, a recent addition to the Upper West Side's increasingly sophisticated eateries.  Located in Emilia-Romagna, Parma is the hometown of the mannerist painter Il Parmigianino and film director Bernardo Bertolucci, an ancient city that may well have Etruscan roots.  The Rosi family, which has produced salumi for generations, has partnered with chef Cesare Casella (formerly of Maremma in the West Village) and modeled their latest restaurant after the family trattoria, Sorelle Picchi, in Parma.  They've created a fun elegant restaurant where one can either nosh or enjoy a full meal: the food is served tapas-style, small plates of delicious meats and cheeses that work best when accompanied by one of the restaurant's fine regional wines.  The simple décor includes marble tables, leather chairs, and a quirky terracotta wall sculpture in the shape of Italy made up of various foods.  As in a traditional Italian salumeria, the meat counter serves as a focal point where patrons can sample and purchase the restaurant's specialties.

 

Salumi, the Italian equivalent of charcuterie or the art of curing meat with salt and spices, refers not just to salami as we know it, but to a wide variety of meats and sausages.  Salumeria Rosi's  selezione, a bewitching ballad of seven meats may include porchetta toscana (a wonderfully spiced boneless pork loin wrapped in pork belly and cooked with rosemary and fennel), mortadella di Bologna (pork studded with lardo and pistachios), speck di Tirolo (a dry-cured, smoked ham from the North of Italy), as well as the restaurant's signature Parmacotto ham (cooked in brine and then in a specialized steam oven).  The Parmacotto brand was developed by the Rosi family.  Don't limit yourself to meats though: Salumeria Rosi's bruschetta is among the finest we've sampled, while the insalata di barbabietole, a salad of roasted beets served in a shallot-chardonnay vinaigrette is refreshingly tangy.  From the fine cheese selection try the amalattea, a sweet semi-soft made from goat's milk.

 

One of the pleasures of the new New York -- finding excellent regional fare throughout the city.  So leave Arthur Avenue and Little Italy behind and head to Amsterdam Avenue, a new home for Italian culinary delights. Buon appetito!      

 

Eat: Salumeria Rosi 

 

 

 

 

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