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Dance 
with Me

 
 

PAS de DEUX

   

 

  

Autumn in New York: along with new theatre, Chelsea gallery openings, and film premieres, dance is on the city's artistic calendar -- a flurry of movement as if keeping in time to the leaves that will start to fall in all the glorious colors of fire!  NYC has a particular love affair with contemporary dance, having witnessed its flowering in the studios of masters such as Martha Graham, Merce Cunningham, and Trisha Brown.  Two very different choreographers from Europe, Emio Greco and Akram Khan have brought their considerable talents to the Joyce and BAM, each one displaying radically different approaches to how one tells a story with movement.

 

Anglo-Bangladeshi wünderkind Akram Khan and French actress extraordinaire Juliette Binoche perform a duet 'In-I' at BAM (through the 26th); a love story with  an immense wall of Rothko-like color designed by Indo-Brit artist Anish Kapoor as backdrop, foil, screen.  The conceit behind this collaboration 'an actor dances and a dancer acts'  unearths in varying degrees unknown talents in both performers.  More interestingly, the two bring a linear, literal narrative to the stage by recounting the joys and travails of a modern love affair through dance and text.  With his charateristic modern spin on the Indian Kathak tradition, Khan displays his signature nimble arm movements and liquid grace, and Binoche moves with considerable agility for someone new to dance.  It's a story of passion and frustrating, perhaps, in its ultimate capitulation....

 

Born in Italy, the Netherlands-based Emio Greco is a genius of movement, a choreographer who pushes the limits of the body in new and idiosyncratic ways.  At the Joyce, beginning September 29, Emio Greco/PC will present the second in the choreographer's Dantesque trilogy: [purgatorio] POPOPERA.  For their trip to purgatory Greco made his dancers learn to play the electric guitar.  The guitar music accompanies Michael Gordon's fine score and also functions as an extension of the body itself.  Here, purgatory emphasizes the possibility of redemption and catharsis, purification through suffering.  Greco's quirky movement vocabulary is whiplash quick and intense, twisting body (and sound!) in ways remarkable, a consciousness of the dancers' in-between space, literally fra cervella e movimento (between brain and movement).  It's a sophisticated, postmodern riff on Dante where story and body meet with jarring and felicitous results….

 

See: [purgatorio] POPOPERA: Emio Greco/PC

 

See: 'In-I' :Akram Khan, Juliette Binoche 

 

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